High Surf Advisory in Effect as Beryl’s Remnant Passes V.I.

Satellite photo shows the remnant of Beryl, the last white mass of clouds slightly up and right of center, passing into the Caribbean early Monday morning.
Satellite photo shows the remnant of Beryl, the last white mass of clouds slightly up and right of center, passing into the Caribbean early Monday morning.

The V.I. Emergency Territorial Management Agency on Sunday issued a high-surf advisory for the U.S. Virgin Islands as the remnants of what was once Hurricane Beryl pass by the territory.

Beryl on Thursday became the first hurricane of the 2018 season, but even as it gained strength, meteorologists predicted the storm, which was smaller than typical, was likely to run into adverse weather conditions and lose strength.

As the weekend progressed, that’s exactly what happened. The storm formerly known as Beryl passed over the Lesser Antilles Sunday and entered the Caribbean as a remnant.

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But though the storm is on the wane, its effects are still going to be felt in the territory.

Beryl is moving west northwest at almost 23 mph, and this motion with an increase in forward speed is expected during the next couple of days. The closest point of approach of the center of the storm to the territory will occur at 9 a.m. Monday when Beryl passes approximately 53 miles south of St. Croix. At that time, Beryl’s top winds are expected between 35-40 miles per hour. Strong gusty winds are possible in the Virgin Islands on Monday. There is also the potential that Beryl could produce total rainfall accumulations of two to three inches across portions of the Leeward and Virgin Islands, as well as Puerto Rico.

A high risk of rip currents will remain in effect through 6 a.m. Tuesday, VITEMA said. Breaking waves as high as 10 feet are expected on beaches in St. Croix. TUESDAY.

At 11 p.m. Monday, the National Hurricane Center issued what it said would be the last update on Beryl, saying that remnants of the storm were over the northeastern Caribbean. with maximum sustained winds of 40 mph.

As of Sunday night, Beryl was comprised of a small swirl of low- to mid-level clouds with isolated patches of deep convection near and east of the center.

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