EARTHQUAKE 4.2 ON RICHTER HITS SATURDAY

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EARTHQUAKE 4.2 ON RICHTER HITS SATURDAY
An earth tremor rumbled through St. Thomas and St. John early Saturday morning.
At 6:50 a.m. a quake was felt in St. Thomas and as far as John's Folly, St. John.
The quake, which was centered at 18.51 latitude and 64.67 longitude, about ten miles east of St. John, measured 4.2 on the Richter scale, according to the National Earthquake Information Service.
It was centered in approximately the same place as the last quake recorded on May 7.

HARD ROCKS, HARD LUCK FOR U.S. ADMIRALS CUP TEAM

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"The unluckiest race I've ever sailed," said Ken Read, captain of Idler, the big boat of the U.S. team. The 225-mile race on Friday and Saturday provided time for almost every possible misfortune to befall Idler and her crew, including Peter Holmberg of the V.I.
A few minutes after the start of the race, scheduled to take about 44 hours, the entire hi-tech instrumentation package aboard the boat shut down. Some time later, noting sluggish performance and falling behind the other boats in their class, the crew discovered and removed a fifty-foot length of fat rope caught on the bottom of the boat.
The determined crew put forth great effort and spent the dark hours of Friday slowly catching and passing the seven other boats in class. While leading the class through the English Channel, Idler sails into a windless "hole" and the boats behind sail by in breeze on either side of the cursed spot.
Idler again slowly worked her way toward the front of the pack of top notch Grand Prix fifty footers. The tide was running against the boats and all the fleet was tacking very close to the shore.
Read explained, "We were just turning to tack off the beach when we hit a rock. The boat was sailing at 7.9 knots and stopped dead. We wrecked it. We tried to move England."
"I went through the wheel and went head over heels into the coffee grinder winch. Everyone went flying. We were real lucky we didn't hurt anyone," Read detailed the incident, "We hurt the boat though, the engine box moved, the keel bolts moved and we have broken keel frames. We're hauling the boat tonight (Saturday) and we'll be working around the clock to be back on the starting line on Monday morning."
After surveying the damage, the crew decided to continue racing and again worked to the front of the class. Passing everyone, and thinking they could still win the race if they can continue to stretch a lead in the remaining twenty miles of race course, Idler discovers the race has been shortened by fourteen miles.
Keith Taylor, press officer of the U.S. team reported that Read related this story with a wry grin, which shows the kind of spirit these sailors have after one race containing a year's worth of problems.
The other boats on the U.S. team, although leading in the first hundred miles of the race, dropped back in the second half. This leaves the U.S. in fifth place at the mathematical midpoint of the regatta.

THE ILLUSION OF INTEGRATION

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"The Color of Our Skin–The Illusion of Integration and the Reality of Race"
"We are all condemned to live together" Albert Camus
About a month ago, I received in the mail a package from an old student and good friend of mine. It was a book written by his sister, along with another colleague at American University. Title above. This insightful book speaks about the state of race relations in America today. I want to talk about it, and especially how it applies to us here in the Virgin Islands.
The authors, Barbara Diggs-Brown and Leonard Steinhorn, argue, and I strongly agree, that integration is an illusion, a reflection of the hopes and dreams of an idealistic nation, having little basis in reality.
"Integration", said Martin Luther King, "is the ultimate goal of our national community." Bill Clinton, like so many of his generation, both black and white, identify integration as the most important moral ideal he grew up with.
What exactly is integration? It is about the realm of life governed by behavior and choice, not statutes and institutions. It should not be confused with desegregation, which means the elimination of discriminatory laws and barriers to full participation in American life.
While desegregation is a necessary precondition for integration, it is entirely possible to desegregate without integrating – for blacks and whites to live on the same island, in the same territory, without learning much about one another or becoming friends, without mixing much on or off the job.
Desegregation may unlock doors, but integration is supposed to unlock minds. Indeed, what makes integration so compelling is that it is about people, not laws. It is about the way we perceive each other; about the way we act toward each other, whether there will ever be room in our hearts, homes, and classrooms to welcome each other as neighbors and friends.
Steeped in the pluralist tradition, integration is both color-blind and color-conscious. It insists on a color-blind approach to character, ability and personal relationships — that people not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. It is built on universal acceptance of people as individuals. Yet it appreciates and welcomes the different black (West Indian) and white traditions, perspectives and historical experiences that make our islands whole.
In a racially integrated Virgin Islands, blacks and whites would choose to live side by side, socialize with ease, see each other as peers, recommend each other for jobs, harbor little mutual distrust, respect each other's outlook and appreciate each other's contributions to each of our islands and the territory.
Prejudice and stereotypes might not completely disappear in an integrated society, but they would not define relationships, images and behavior as they do today.
As former civil rights strategist Bayard Rustin used to say, "We will be truly integrated when a black person can make the same mistakes as a white without anyone drawing special attention to it."
To hear most whites talk about it, here in the territory, they are living up to their part of the bargain. So pervasive is the integration consensus that people are often unprepared or confused when confronted with evidence of its' breakdown.
Shock and surprise are sentiments expressed by one or another political leader almost every time overt racial conflict breaks out — these incidents must be the exception — not the rule. Many whites state their preference to live in a racially mixed neighborhood, but few neighborhoods actually reflect that mix.
While these are gross generalizations, look closely at Chocolate Hole, St. John, to Jacob's ladder; Savan to Mafolie Estates in St. Thomas; Frederiksted and Christiansted to name just a few.
The story is no different when it comes to schools. On St. John look at Sprauve as compared to Pine Peace; on St. Thomas compare Sibilly with Peace Corps, or Eudora Kean with Antilles. A majority of whites support public schools, just not for their own children.
Or look at the bars: Compare Mooey's with Skinny Legs; Two Plus Two with The Lost Dog; The Petit Pump Room or Percy's with Eperney or Alexander's. The contrast between professed racial attitudes and actual racial reality should come as no surprise.
Ever since the 60's, as society began to shun overt bigotry and applaud gestures of racial tolerance, social scientists have found whites to exaggerate their contact with and support for blacks.
Once, however, we strip away the rhetoric and symbolism of integration, we are left with an island only marginally less divided than it was when a quarter of a million Americans descended on Washington for the great civil rights march of 1963.
Perhaps, if we hold constant for decreased numbers, we, in the Virgin Islands, are even more divided. The barriers today create a different type of separation — behavioral, social, residential, and psychological — but it is an abiding and resilient separation nonetheless.
There is a perceptible perception gap between the ways that West Indians in particular and blacks in general, view the world, as compared to the views of white Americans.
Built into almost every interaction between blacks and whites is the entire history of race relations in America. The past is truly prologue here; it shapes who we are and how we understand the world.
Although blacks are reminded of it daily, no American is free of this cultural and historical dowry. In most black–white interaction the history remains buried and rarely springs forth, but when it does, it releases a coiled up tension almost four centuries old in the making.
Whites, often so oblivious to the history, are taken aback and even offended when blacks react with such deep anger. This happened and abruptly terminated the "racial sensitivity" sessions held on St. John several years ago. Whites appeared terrified by the hostility verbalized by young West Indians at the session, and refused to return.
Most compelling are the different ways that whites and blacks view the problem of discrimination. Whites see themselves as well meaning and concerned about racial equality. They believe themselves to be fair, if not color-blind, and cannot imagine themselves as blatantly discriminating. Needless to say, blacks don't view discrimination the same way. Most Virgin Islands blacks see or experience at least some type of discrimination whenever they come in contact with whites.
Whereas whites see racism as an exception today, to blacks, the exception is when race doesn't enter into their daily lives. How many restaurants have West Indian servers? How many businesses in down town Cruz Bay, or even in Coral Bay, are owned by West Indians? How much major business concerns are owned by blacks? Who is the black Prosser? The black Ackley? The black Hess?
What emerges is a cycle of misunderstanding that begins with a gap in perception and escalates as whites and blacks deal with the consequences. The chain reaction begins when whites deny the extent of racial discrimination in our territory. The more whites minimize discrimination and elevate "reverse discrimination" as the moral equivalent of the black experience in America, the more blacks feel compelled to validate, defend and amplify their grievances.
If whites do not see discrimination as a serious problem, attempts to remedy it will indeed seem outrageous to them. To blacks, the white inability to acknowledge the prevalence of discrimination is reason enough that affirmative action must continue.
Misunderstanding, bitterness, and polarization are all by-products of the perception gap. Integration is its primary victim.
It is time for our new administrator to place racial issues high on his agenda, and move toward stopping the prevailing denial. It is time, as well, for our new governor to address these issues on a territorial basis. The time is now, before a serious incident precipitates
reaction rather than a more proactive stance. May we hear from you regarding this?
Editor's note: Dr. Iris Kern is director of the Safety Zone in St. John.

SEWAGE CRISIS THREATENS ST. CROIX

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While St. Croix's — and the Virgin Islands' — sewage woes aren't new, recent problems are beginning to impact the Big Island's struggling tourism industry.
Although the Figtree sewage pump station was repaired about a month ago, after unknown amounts of raw sewage was bypassed into Cane Garden Bay, the out-of-commission LBJ pump station continues to dump waste into the sea.
And that is killing business at three beach resorts near the offending pump, said Adam Hoover, director of Antilles Resort Management Inc., operator of Club St. Croix, Colony Cove and Mill Harbor resorts.
"I'm out of business in St. Croix — plain and simple," Hoover said at Thursday's Senate Committee on Environmental Protection in Frederiksted.
Because of the problems, he said the company had to inform major tour operators on the mainland that the resorts will not accept guests because of the sewage being piped out just past nearby Long Reef.
"I either do it voluntarily or the tour operators look at us as not being honest with them," Hoover said in a subsequent interview.
The long-standing problems with the LBJ pump station has cost the company $100,000 over the last year and about $75,000 in gross revenues in the past 30 days, Hoover said. And when the company loses, Hoover said St. Croix and the V.I. government will as well, through lost jobs and reduced taxes.
"This is about the worst I've seen," he said. "It's money out of everyone's pocket."
When sewage is bypassed into the sea, the Department of Planning and Natural Resources is mandated to post warning signs along the shore while it tests the water. Since the latest problem at the LBJ pump has been going on for a month, that means the signs are constantly up. And that's not what tourists want to see, said Hoover.
Still, he emphasized that while the beach was closed as a precautionary measure, all water tests conducted by DPNR revealed results that complied with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards.
"I have found that the water along the coast is compliant," Hoover said. "Nevertheless, the signs stay up and I lose business."
According to Wayne Callwood, assistant commissioner of the Department of Public Works, the LBJ pump station should be operational by July 20.
But that's only a small step in the territory's decades-long struggle to meet federal Clean Water Act requirements. Since the early 1980s, the EPA and the U.S. Department of Justice have levied millions of dollars worth of fines for the territory's wastewater noncompliance. In 1985 and 1994, the U.S. Department of Justice, on behalf of the EPA, sued the V.I. government to force it to properly treat sewage being released into near-shore waters.
In 1996, the two parties signed a consent decree that called for specific steps to be taken, such as the construction of a wastewater treatment plant on St. John and one near the Mangrove Lagoon on St. Thomas.
For the most part, however, St. Croix hasn't seen any significant sewage system improvements other than the replacement of a section of pipe at the Figtree station last year.
"This is an issue that's a crisis on St. Croix," Sen. Alicia "Chucky" Hansen said last week. "We'll have to spend a few million dollars to save several million."
Sen. Almando Liburd has suggested that the a state of emergency on sewage and solid waste be declared in the territory.
Meanwhile, there are rumblings within the community and the St. Croix Environmental Association about a lawsuit against the EPA and V.I. government to spur repair and replacement of a system that includes pipes that are 50 years old.
"As far as I'm concerned, it's way past the time to sweep it under the rug," said Hoover. "There's too much money involved and the environmental impact is too great."
(f)

UNIONS WILL FIGHT LAYOFFS

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Gov. Charles Turnbull's administration is in for a fight over any cuts that result in the layoffs of unionized government employees, according to Central Labor Council President Luis "Tito" Morales.
"So far, none of the unions are in favor of the cuts and they expressed that yesterday," Morales said Saturday, a day after a 15 percent budget reduction was announced.
"If it comes to lay-offs, the last to come is the first to go. Before any unionized employees are laid off, all the temporary people have to be laid off and all the exempt people have to go first," he said.
"I'm not supporting any layoffs in education," said Cecil Benjamin, president of the St. Croix American Federation of Teachers. "We've already been living with a cut since 1991 and 1992. We're being paid at 1993 levels, that's a cut."
Benjamin said the administration should have begun eliminating the "numerous, unnecessary" upper-level exempt positions when it took over in January.
The unions' frustrations, however, are also directed at the private sector.
"If we say everyone needs to participate in solving problems, we can't continue to give exemptions to companies and balance the budget on the backs of government employees," Morales said. "The private sector has to participate. If the private sector doesn't do its part, then the government employees won't do their part and we'll leave it fall where it may."
Turnbull announced the hefty budget reduction after meeting with federal officials Thursday and meeting with the legislature, labor leaders and business leaders on Friday. He has apparently ordered department heads to cut their budgets by 15 percent.
The budget was previously trimmed by 5 percent from about $488 million to $466 million. The additional 10 percent cut drops spending another $46 million, but exact figures were not available Saturday.
Benjamin said, however, some departments should cut more and some should cut less.
"This one-size-fits-all approach to solve the problem is wrong. The governor needs to prioritize in terms of what is most important," Benjamin said. "I can't see cutting education by 10 or 15 percent. You'll be throwing out some valuable programs and many teachers are already leaving.
"Come September, you're going to see a dire shortage," he said.
Turnbull is now expected to send several pieces of cost cutting legislation to the Senate in the coming weeks. According to senators interviewed Friday, these bills may include authorization to take out a $100 million loan, government reorganization, the elimination of five government holidays, and the 15 percent budget cut.
"Some of these proposals are negotiable and therefore, the administration can't do them by themselves," Morales said. "The unions have to agree."
The plan Turnbull presented Friday lacked any significant revenue generating proposals, Benjamin said.
"You can balance the budget and reduce the debt tomorrow, but if you don't come up with some ways to generate revenue, you're going to come to the same problem again and again and again," he said.
St. Croix Chamber of Commerce President Noel Loftus said the private sector is willing to make sacrifices.
"The chambers are willing to talk to the companies to see if they will push incentives back. Some are willing to, but some can't, some wouldn't be able to stay open" Loftus said. "But the Industrial Development Commission has lost its way. The purpose of tax breaks is to induce business to come that would not otherwise be here, not ones that would be here anyway."
The cuts impact everyone in the territory, Loftus said.
"It's not a very pleasant moment, it's not good news for anyone, but there's no choice," he said. "You have the entire community very apprehensive. They know the problems are here, they know they have to be faced and everybody's go to cutback spending."
The business sector could make other sacrifices, according to Benjamin.
"Businesses continue to raise their prices and we are still being paid at 1993 levels," Benjamin said. "Why can't they keep 1993 prices?"
The sentiment of many in business and government is that the government workforce is too large and its payroll has to be trimmed substantially.
"Who gets fired first is the biggest question," Sen. Anne Golden said after Friday's meeting. "We do have a monster of a government and a workforce that's really too large, and it needs to be streamlined."
The unions, however, don't necessarily agree the government is too large, Morales said.
"Every department head says they are short-staffed, especially those who have to collect revenues. So if they're short-staffed, how is it that we have too many people on the payroll?" he said. "The previous administration hired people for some political agenda and not for the needs of the departments."
"That has to stop and these people have to be transferred to positions that are needed," he said.
Morales said unions may be amenable to proposals to buy out employees who are willing to leave government service.
"We have said to the government, there are a lot of people who if you put them on step and pay their retroactive wages, they will retire," he said. "That's a buyout, isn't it?"
Layoffs will likely result in social unrest because the private sector cannot afford to absorb a large amount of employees, Benjamin said.
"There's going to be more thefts, more violence, more shooting, people are just going to be desperate," he said.
Loftus said the opening of the Divi Casino, which may employ as many as 250 people, and the construction of HOVENSA's coker plant could absorb laid off government workers.
The unions feel no concessions are being made to protect employees, Morales said.
"One problem we saw is there is no plan to put government employees on their correct step and start paying them their retroactive wages," he said. "However, they are making reference to how they are going to pay vendors."
St. Thomas-St. John Chamber of Commerce President John de Jongh said Saturday, "I recognize the governor's plan requires sacrifice by all sectors as we attempt to adjust. But there is no magic in these solutions. They are all things that have been on the table for a long time. It is simply a matter of implementing them."
(f)

UNIONS WILL FIGHT LAYOFFS

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Gov. Charles Turnbull's administration is in for a fight over any cuts that result in the layoffs of unionized government employees, according to Central Labor Council President Luis "Tito" Morales.
"So far, none of the unions are in favor of the cuts and they expressed that yesterday," Morales said Saturday, a day after a 15 percent budget reduction was announced.
"If it comes to lay-offs, the last to come is the first to go. Before any unionized employees are laid off, all the temporary people have to be laid off and all the exempt people have to go first," he said.
"I'm not supporting any layoffs in education," said Cecil Benjamin, president of the St. Croix American Federation of Teachers. "We've already been living with a cut since 1991 and 1992. We're being paid at 1993 levels, that's a cut."
Benjamin said the administration should have begun eliminating the "numerous, unnecessary" upper-level exempt positions when it took over in January.
The unions' frustrations, however, are also directed at the private sector.
"If we say everyone needs to participate in solving problems, we can't continue to give exemptions to companies and balance the budget on the backs of government employees," Morales said. "The private sector has to participate. If the private sector doesn't do its part, then the government employees won't do their part and we'll leave it fall where it may."
Turnbull announced the hefty budget reduction after meeting with federal officials Thursday and meeting with the legislature, labor leaders and business leaders Friday. He has apparently ordered department heads to cut their budgets by 15 percent.
The budget was previously trimmed by 5 percent from about $488 million to $466 million. The additional 10 percent cut drops spending another $46 million, but exact figures were not available Saturday.
Benjamin said, however, some departments should cut more and some should cut less.
"This one-size-fits-all approach to solve the problem is wrong. The governor needs to prioritize in terms of what is most important," Benjamin said. "I can't see cutting education by 10 or 15 percent. You'll be throwing out some valuable programs and many teachers are already leaving.
"Come September, you're going to see a dire shortage," he said.
Turnbull is now expected to send several pieces of cost cutting legislation to the Senate in the coming weeks. According to senators interviewed Friday, these bills may include authorization to take out a $100 million loan, government reorganization, the elimination of five government holidays, and the 15 percent budget cut.
"Some of these proposals are negotiable and, therefore, the administration can't do them by themselves," Morales said. "The unions have to agree."
The plan Turnbull presented Friday lacked any significant revenue generating proposals, Benjamin said.
"You can balance the budget and reduce the debt tomorrow, but if you don't come up with some ways to generate revenue, you're going to come to the same problem again and again and again," he said.
St. Croix Chamber of Commerce President Noel Loftus said the private sector is willing to make sacrifices.
"The chambers are willing to talk to the companies to see if they will push incentives back. Some are willing to, but some can't, some wouldn't be able to stay open" Loftus said. "But the Industrial Development Commission has lost its way. The purpose of tax breaks is to induce businesses to come that would not otherwise be here, not ones that would be here anyway."
The cuts impact everyone in the territory, Loftus said.
"It's not a very pleasant moment, it's not good news for anyone, but there's no choice," he said. "You have the entire community very apprehensive. They know the problems are here, they know they have to be faced and everybody's got to cutback spending."
The business sector could make other sacrifices, according to Benjamin.
"Businesses continue to raise their prices and we are still being paid at 1993 levels," Benjamin said. "Why can't they keep 1993 prices?"
The sentiment of many in business and government is that the workforce is too large and its payroll has to be trimmed substantially.
"Who gets fired first is the biggest question," Sen. Anne Golden said after Friday's meeting. "We do have a monster of a government and a workforce that's really too large, and it needs to be streamlined."
The unions, however, don't necessarily agree the government is too large, Morales said.
"Every department head says they are short-staffed, especially those who have to collect revenues. So if they're short-staffed, how is it that we have too many people on the payroll?" he said. "The previous administration hired people for some political agenda and not for the needs of the departments."
"That has to stop and these people have to be transferred to positions that are needed," he said.
Morales said unions may be amenable to proposals to buy out employees who are willing to leave government service.
"We have said to the government, there are a lot of people who if you put them on step and pay their retroactive wages, they will retire," he said. "That's a buyout, isn't it?"
Layoffs will likely result in social unrest because the private sector cannot afford to absorb a large amount of employees, Benjamin said.
"There's going to be more thefts, more violence, more shooting, people are just going to be desperate," he said.
Loftus said the opening of the Divi Casino, which may employ as many as 250 people, and the construction of HOVENSA's coker plant could absorb laid off government workers.
The unions feel no concessions are being made to protect employees, Morales said.
"One problem we saw is there is no plan to put government employees on their correct step and start paying them their retroactive wages," he said. "However, they are making reference to how they are going to pay vendors."
St. Thomas-St. John Chamber of Commerce President John de Jongh said Saturday, "I recognize the governor's plan requires sacrifice by all sectors as we attempt to adjust. But there is no magic in these solutions. They are all things that have been on the table for a long time. It is simply a matter of implementing them."
(f)

EARTHQUAKE 4.2 ON RICHTER HITS SATURDAY

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An earth tremor rumbled through St. Thomas and St. John early Saturday morning.
At 6:50 a.m. a quake was felt in St. Thomas and as far as John's Folly, St. John.
The quake, which was centered at 18.51 latitude and 64.67 longitude, about ten miles east of St. John, measured 4.2 on the Richter scale, according to the National Earthquake Information Service.
It was centered in approximately the same place as the last quake recorded on May 7.

FORMER VIRGIN ISLANDER SHOWS WELL IN THE BAY AREA

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Corinne Innis, who grew up between St. Thomas, St. John and Manhattan, is making inroads into art circles in San Francisco.
Innis is the youngest daughter of Mary Innis of St. John and Roy Innis of St. Croix.
Innis calls herself an Afro-Caribbean artist. "I think wherever you are from is what your art reflects. If I were from Italy I guess I would call my work Italian art."
Innis says she is also a modern artist. "I guess that comes from living part time in Manhattan."
She say though she was born in New York she was brought almost immediately to St. John. "My first memories are of St. John."
Throughout her life Innis moved between the Virgin Islands and New York.
"When I graduated from college I came back to St. John," where she stayed from 1986 until 1989 when she moved to Berkeley, CA.
Innis' work was first seen publicly in February 1997 at an exhibit entitled "Women From Far Away." The exhibit showcased the work of women from places such as Ethiopia, and Chili.
Since then Innis has shown her work as a participant in Pro Arts and the Art of Living Black Open Studios.
Last November her painting "Orixa and Her Disciples" was used as the poster and postcard for Ishmael Reed's latest play "Hubba City." The image also ran on the front page to the style section of the San Francisco Examiner as part of an article on Ishmael Reed.
One of her pieces — "potted plant" — a three dimensional live plant in a pot, was chosen to be part of Pro Arts' juried exhibition.
Out of 719 works "potted plant" was one of 12 works selected to be in their yearly calendar.
In January "Orixa and Her Disciples" and "Three Sisters With Boat" were selected to be in the exhibit — "What We Think of Ourselves" — at the Center for Visual Art in Oakland.
Innis works in a variety of mediums.
Bright colors and expressive facial features are characteristic of Innis' work. She would like to see her work translated to designs on album covers and shower curtains or mouse pads.
"I think many artists don't think art should be a business," she said.
"I want to have more functional use for my work. Instead of waiting to sell originals, I want to sell the images.
Innis has already come up with mousepads and other items that carry her images and is working on new ideas all the time.
"There are a million things that need images. The Kleenex box needs an image," she said.
"I want to stay home and work and create my art."
Innis knows she has to be able to make enough money at it to do that.

Editors' note: To view Innis' work go to Showcase.

'WE'RE WORKING ON IT'

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The Reichhold Youth Theater Presents "We're Working on It!" — a production of their own-design for children of all ages at 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. July 24 and 25 at the UVI Little Theatre.
Tickets are $5 and are available from students of the Theatre, Reichhold Box Office 693-1559, and UVI Little Theatre : 2 p.m.-6:30 p.m., Monday-Thursday and on show nights.

REICHHOLD YOUTH THEATER PRESENTS TWO ONE ACT PLAYS

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The advanced class of the Reichhold Youth Theatre will be presenting two one- act plays at 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. on July 31 and August 1 at the UVI Little Theater.
The plays to be presented are: "ARIA DA CAPO" by Edna St. Vincent Millay and
"The Actor's Nightmare" by Christopher Durang.
Tickets are $5 and are available from students of the Theatre, Reichhold Box Office 693-1559, and UVI Little Theatre : 2 p.m.-6:30 p.m., Monday-Thursday and on show nights.