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Heavy Rainfall Prompts VITEMA Flood Watch Warning

The Virgin Islands Territorial Emergency Management Agency issued a flood watch for the territory at 3 p.m. Tuesday, warning that heavy rain could lead to severe flooding, mudslides and flash flooding. The warning will be in effect until midday Thursday.

UVI and VITEMA Work to Update Hazard Mitigation Plan

The University of the Virgin Islands and the V.I. Territorial Emergency Management Agency are continuing their annual effort to update the territory’s “Hazard Mitigation Plan,” a requirement for FEMA emergency assistance.
Greg Guannel, director of UVI’s Caribbean Green Technology Center, measures sediment depth in the gut that empties near the seaplane terminal in Christiansted. (Photo submitted by Hilary Lohmann, DPNR)

UVI-DPNR Project Aims to Assess Coastal Vulnerability

Scientists at the V.I. Department of Planning and Natural Resources and University of the Virgin Islands are teaming up to develop a locally relevant Coastal Vulnerability Index.
Gov. Albert Bryan speaks at Monday's news conference. (Image captured from the V.I. Government's livestream of the press conference)

Governor Lifts STX Curfew Immediately; STT Curfew Until Morning

Gov. Albert Bryan lifted the curfew for St. Croix and said the St. Thomas-St. John curfew would be lifted at 8 a.m., during a post-storm press briefing 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.

V.I. Electricity Returning, Seemingly Mostly Minor Damage As Dorian Moves Away

Dorian, the fast-moving Category 1 hurricane, was some 45 miles to the northwest of St. Thomas by Wednesday evening, having brought hurricane force winds and as much as five inches of rain to portions of the Virgin Islands Wednesday afternoon.

Dorian Now a Hurricane As It Crosses USVI *Update*

Dorian has been upgraded to a Category One Hurricane as it nears St. Thomas with top winds of 75 miles per hour. St. Thomas' Cyril E. King Airport has been closed for the day due to the storm. Hurricane Dorian is tracking to the northwest at 13 miles per hour, and a Hurricane Warning remains posted for the Virgin Islands. There have been numerous reports of hurricane-force winds on St. Thomas over the past couple of hours. A weather station just south of St. Thomas recently reported sustained winds of 82 miles per hour, with a gust to 111 miles per hour Conditions on St. Thomas’s northside began to deteriorate rapidly just after noontime. High winds and horizontal rain whipped at trees and bush flattening the front-yard purple Mexican petunias and turning roadways into rivers. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ppZpd2YqgWY At 2:45 an alert announced sustained winds on St. Thomas of 82 mph with gusts to 111, suggesting that Dorian became a hurricane as it moved over the island. Large tree branches had begun to accumulate in roadways blocking passage and the heavy gusting rains showed no signs of diminishing at of 3 p.m. On the present track, Dorian should continue to move over the U.S. Virgin Islands Wednesday afternoon, and then over the open Atlantic waters later Wednesday night. Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 20 miles to the north and east of the center, while tropical storm force winds extend up to 80 miles east of the center. Dorian has the potential to produce 4-6 inches of rain across the Virgin Islands. Such volumes of rainfall may cause life-threatening flash floods. Additionally, swells will increase across the Virgin Islands causing life-threatening surf and rip current conditions. St. Croix is already being impacted by tropical storm force winds which should last until late Wednesday afternoon. Tropical storm force winds will begin to affect St. Thomas & St. John within the hour and continue through Wednesday night. Seaports are closed until further notice. Vitran bus service is cancelled until further notice. A curfew is in effect until 6 a.m. Thursday

On the Ground on STT: Flash Floods Bringing Down Rocks, Trees and Roadsides

Visibility was almost nil Wednesday afternoon on St. Thomas as rushing waters made several foot-high fountains out of fallen rocks along the shoulders with downed trees adding to the already treacherous conditions.

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