ELECTRICIANS AND PLUMBERS EXAM DATE SET

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Lisa Davis, assistant DLCA commissioner for boards and commissions, announces the electricians and plumbers exam date for Wednesday,Feb.10, at 9 a.m. at the DLCA office.
For more information contact the Office of Boards and Commissions at 774-3130.

BEACON SCHOOLS WIN BIG FEDERAL GRANT

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Beacon Schools of the Virgin Islands have been awarded a $197,304 federal grant to promote mentoring for its young clients.
The JUMP grant, as it is called, is from the U.S. Justice Department's office of juvenile justice and delinquency prevention.
The grant will allow the islands' three Beacon Schools and the V.I. Education Department to provide mentors to at-risk black and Latino boys between 12 and 16 who attend public junior high schools.
They'll recruit mentors through a media campaign and by targeting law-enforcement agencies, human service agencies, businesses and colleges. The boys will be selected in collaboration with public school staffers.
The program will kick off with a "JUMP Training Academy," according to Valerie George, Beacon Schools executive director, and will feature monthly feedback sessions that will include the mentor, the youth and parents. Parents will be encouraged to take part in mentoring selection and planning sessions, George said.
George called the grant "good news."
V.I. Delegate Donna Christian-Christensen commended Beacon Schools and called for more of these types of programs to be developed.
"With the excessive acts of violence being committed by young men in this community, I applaud the efforts of the Beacon Schools to work with our youth in a proactive manner," she said. "I would like to encourage other agencies that work with juveniles to aggressively pursue grants and other sources of funding to implement programs for the youth of this territory."

CHRISTENSEN OPPOSES LIVE TESTIMONY IN IMPEACHMENT TRIAL

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Virgin Islands Congressional Delegate Donna M. Christian-Christensen joined women members of the Congressional Black Caucus and other women’s organizations to decry the appearance of live witness testimony for the President’s impeachment trial.
Christensen, and the group spoke out against the possible appearance of Monica Lewinsky and others in the Senate chambers. “There is absolutely no legitimacy to this kind of proceeding… Such a vote would be a violation of the constitution, a repudiation of all the Congress has stood for and an affront to the people of this country,” the Delegate said.
Congresswoman Christensen has expressed her continued support for President Clinton to remain in office on numerous occasions. “Throughout this ordeal, I have often worn a button that reads ‘Committed to Clinton,’. I wear it on behalf of my constituents in the Virgin Islands, and others who have judged this President as our friend,” the Delegate concluded.

GERS BOARD MEETS FEB. 9

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The Government Employees Retirement System board of trustees will meet at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 9, at the GERS Orange Grove, St. Croix, conference room.

WHAT'S YOUR BIG IDEA?

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Somewhere inside you is the Big Idea that will bring you success.
Every major breakthrough in every field has been a big idea that can be stated simply.
Even Einstein got his into one formula: E=MC2. On a more mundane level, the big idea behind Domino's Pizza when it was starting out was "your pizza delivered within 30 minutes or you get it for free." The MacDonald's big idea was "a dependably good burger wherever you go, served quickly in clean surroundings."
When Apple computers first came out, the big idea was, "a computer that ordinary people can learn how to use." In my view the big idea behind the electronic newspaper you're reading is, "a news source of the people, by the people, for the people."
The importance of having a big idea was pointed out to me by George Lois, one of America's top advertising men. One of his advertising big ideas was the "I Want My MTV!" campaign when the music channel was struggling for acceptance by cable operators. Lois is on a one-man campaign against the little idea, convinced that most of the time most of us are too scared to assert ourselves and our originality.
"That's the story of mankind," he says. "We live in fear of life, in fear of work, in fear of death."
According to him, the antidote is to think big and have the courage to push our big ideas.
You can learn to develop big ideas in your work life and your personal life.
If you run a business or offer a service, what is the big idea behind it that sets it apart from your competitors?
It could be, "The car repair place that's clean and fun to hang around while waiting for your car to be fixed." It could be, "The accountant who talks to you in language you actually understand." It could be, "The café where your first cup of coffee is free."
You can harness the power of the Big Idea if you work for someone else. It could be, "The waitress who always has a smile for you." Or, "The secretary who knows where everything is." Or, "The manager who knows the names of the children of all the people who work for him."
A Big Idea can be equally useful in your personal life. In your primary relationship, you can choose to be "a partner who always listens." In your friendships, you can be "the friend who always finds something positive to say about her friends."
If you're on a drive to lose weight or be more fit, your big idea can be "doing one thing every day to be more healthy."
Take a moment to consider what is the Big Idea in each part of your life. Can you state each one in one simple sentence? If not, you may find that generating a Big Idea will help you focus your efforts and keep you on track.

Editor's note: Jurgen Wolff is the editor and publisher of "Brainstorm," the creativity newsletter, and teaches the "Create Your Future" workshop. For a free copy of Brainstorm, e-mail your mailing address to FutureUK@aol.com. (c) Jurgen Wolff 1999

TIPS FOR PARENTS TO HELP THEIR KIDS IN SCHOOL

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Parents, here are some tips on how to help your child achieve in school, put out by the V.I. Education Department:
— Know what is going on in school. Call and visit your child's school.
— Be supportive of the school.
— Offer to help quiz for tests or review, but realize that some students will reject this offer.
— Help your child to set, and write down, goals.
— Keep cummunications lines open with the school.
— Provide an adequate study atmosphere and study materials at home.
— Try suggestions of teachers and other school staff.
— Give the school information about your child that may be helpful.

RELEASE NAMES OF JUVENILE FELONS

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In view of the brutality displayed by some juveniles these days, it may be time to seriously re-evaluate our juvenile crime laws. But it is certainly time to enforce the laws already on the books.
Currently, the names of minors charged with or convicted of any crimes are not released to the public. However, the Virgin Islands Code, section 2531, states that the Territorial Court's family division and the V.I. Police Department "shall release the names of minors 14 years and older and their parents, as part of the public record, whenever the minor is adjudicated delinquent for committing an act which would be a felony if committed by an adult.”
That's the law.
In a large community, releasing those names might not make much difference.
Here it could be embarrassing for families and innocent acquaintances of the offenders. It could also protect the public from some of the predators who prey on the uninformed and, therefore, unsuspecting citizenry.
There is a natural and appropriate desire to protect our innocent and even not-so-innocent youth. They are, after all, only children.
But if they choose to behave as felonious adults, then the least we can do is make them and their actions known to the truly innocent public. And making the names of their parents public might eventually lead to more attentive parenting and thus a reduction in the sometimes heinous crimes committed by these “children.”
The public must demand that the courts and the police begin, immediately, to make these names public. We repeat -— it's the law.

POLICE OFFICER IAN WILLIAMS JR. ARRESTED

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Police Officer Ian E. Williams Jr. has been arrested on a federal charge of tampering with a victim and witness and a territorial charge of third-degree assault.
The arrest stems from a Dec. 2 incident in which Williams, 27, allegedly put a handgun to a woman's head and threatened to kill her, according to a release Friday from the U.S. Attorney's Office.
The federal charge accuses him of "intentionally harassing" the woman to prevent her from reporting to authorities the possible commission of a federal civil rights offense.
The maximum penalty for the victim-witness tampering offense is one year in prison and a $5,000 fine. The maximum penalty for the assault charge is five years in prison and a $3,000 fine.
U.S. Magistrate Geoffrey W. Barnard on Friday ordered Williams to remain in custody pending a detention hearing Tuesday.
The announcement of the arrest was made jointly by U.S. Attorney James A. Hurd Jr.; James K. Weber, FBI special agent in charge; and Franz A. Christian Sr., acting V.I. Police commissioner.
Hurd commended the FBI and V.I. Police Department officers who investigated the case.

FEDS HELP PAY JAIL COSTS FOR ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS

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The Virgin Islands will receive $652,948 from the U.S. Justice Department to help cover the cost of incarcerating undocumented immigrants who have committed serious crimes.
The Virgin Islands was one of 297 state, territorial and local jurisdictions to get the special State Criminal Alien Assistance Program grants, according to a release Friday from U.S. Attorney James A. Hurd Jr.
The grants are designed to reduce the burden for local jurisdictions of housing illegal aliens in their jails.

JANETTE MILLIN WRITING EDITORIALS AT DAILY NEWS

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Former Gov. Roy Schneider's public relations team has landed at the V.I. Daily News.
Hat Hatfield, a former reporter there, returned as soon as the new administration took over. His colleague, Janette Millin, joined him last week. He's back to writing stories and she's writing editorials.
Millin said her job at The Daily News is temporary. Her background is in broadcast media and "I intend to be moving on to Cable when they begin [local news] programming," she said.
Jeffrey Prosser, whose Innovative Communications Corp. owns the Daily News, also owns the two cable television companies in the Virgin Islands and has signaled his intention to begin local news programming.
So Millin's assignment at The Daily News looks like a stop-gap but for now she writes the daily editorial with "guidance from the [editorial] board."
Meanwhile, the woman who is editorial page editor, Gwendolyn Kelly, selects, edits and puts together the other items on the two editorial pages.
Hatfield, prior to his first stint at The Daily News, had been an aide in both the legislative and executive branches. He spent several years as a reporter at the paper but left to become Schneider's press secretary in early 1997, just before rumors began circulating that Prosser, Schneider's friend and political supporter, was buying the paper. The sale was finalized at the end of that year.