82.2 F
Cruz Bay
Friday, May 24, 2024
HomeNewsLocal newsNew Seven Flags Museum Features Antiques from Around the World

New Seven Flags Museum Features Antiques from Around the World

Most people know Teddy Richards for his catering and elegant cooking, but after collecting antiques for 30 years, he opened the Seven Flags Museum a few months in downtown Christiansted. Now he can host events, cater and display elegant antiques at the same time.

Owner Teddy Richards poses in the front room of his museum, surrounded by scores and scores of antiques. (Source photo by Susan Ellis)
Owner Teddy Richards poses in the front room of his museum, surrounded by scores and scores of antiques. (Source photo by Susan Ellis)

He considers his ability to spot beautiful and valuable antiques, as a “gift from God.” Many of the items are not for sale because they are so unique.

“They’re one of a kind,” Richards said, referring to one of the large armoires he says is one of his favorite pieces. That wardrobe and other heavy furniture won’t be moved “until Jesus comes,” he added.

Richards’ collections include dozens of fine china plates from around the world. Around a dozen moko jumbies – adults and children – overwhelm the senses with color and size, at the entrance to the museum. There are clocks that run on batteries, representing each time zone, in the main room. They are reset before each event.

The collection of teapots, in another room, is extensive and includes a hot beverage receptacle from Egypt.

The collection of ceramic and porcelain teapots includes one made in Egypt. (Source photo by Susan Ellis)
The collection of ceramic and porcelain teapots includes one made in Egypt. (Source photo by Susan Ellis)

Other collections, displayed in highly-polished furniture cases and groupings, are from Denmark, England, France and America and were either donated or purchased on St Croix. One piece of furniture is identical to a cupboard seen in the historical-drama television series, “The Crown,” Richards told the Source.

The collection of shoes, in the back room, includes vintage boots, fashion heels, cowboy boots and antique shoe molds. There also are mugs shaped like shoes and a glass table set on an ornate black mid-sized heel from the last century.

A round table covered in gold is the focal point in one of the rooms at Seven Flags Museum. (Source photo by Susan Ellis)
A round table covered in gold is the focal point in one of the rooms at Seven Flags Museum. (Source photo by Susan Ellis)

A collector leaving St. Croix gave Richards “thousands” of ceramic hands and only about five percent are on display. He plans to rotate the statues.

The sugar mill room includes renderings from the sugar mill period. There is a big dinner bell that Richards uses to get attention during exhibitions.

One of the large pieces of furniture - an armoire - and other antiques at the Seven Flags Museum. (Source photo by Susan Ellis)
One of the large pieces of furniture – an armoire – and other antiques at the Seven Flags Museum. (Source photo by Susan Ellis)

A single statue – a large head – rests on top of one of the large armoires. Richards said it came from the iconic Violette Boutique, a local boutique that sold exclusive perfumes.

The Seven Flags Museum is open to the public. General admission to is a $7 donation. Adults with disabilities and senior citizens over the age of 60, are admitted free. People can also schedule private tours.

Annual memberships are $70 for an individual or $270 for a family. Members qualify for free admission, complimentary admission for a guest, quarterly newsletters, early access to exhibition tours and member-only events. Members also enjoy priority reservations for pop-up events.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Keeping our community informed is our top priority.
If you have a news tip to share, please call or text us at 340-228-8784.

Support local + independent journalism in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Unlike many news organizations, we haven't put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as accessible as we can. Our independent journalism costs time, money and hard work to keep you informed, but we do it because we believe that it matters. We know that informed communities are empowered ones. If you appreciate our reporting and want to help make our future more secure, please consider donating.

UPCOMING EVENTS